NANO BUBBLE GENERATOR

WHAT IS NANO BUBBLE

Micro bubbles (MBs) are generally defined as gaseous bubbles with a diameter of less than 100μm and larger than 10μm.

Nano bubbles (NBs) are bubbles with a diameter of < 1μm (also known as ultrafine bubbles). Due to their size and structure, nano bubbles have unique features that make them particularly effective for water treatment, industrial and agricultural applications.

Nano bubbles have a negative surface charge, making them very stable in liquids, where they can be suspended for weeks without releasing gases, and mass transfer is more efficient. NBs enhance adsorption and chemical reactions in the gas-liquid interface, and the collapse of NBs creates shock waves and promotes the formation of hydroxyl radicals(HO), which is one of the strongest oxidants known and is commonly used to remove refractory and refractory pollutants from water.

APPLICATIONS

Plant health improvement and soil nutrient release

Farms, cows/sheep raising, and drink water with oxygenated water

Aquaculture production increase (e.g., lawn growers, small farms for hypotonic cultures)

Food and vegetable disinfection for household applications

Lake/contaminated water remediation/algal bloom mitigation for aeration

Water and wastewater treatment

Hydrogen or ozone water as a medicine supplement

Dental cleaning to replace deionized water

Flue gas/CO2 capture/treatment to increase reactivity and solubility for algal cultivation

Fuel cells for hydrogen and oxygen reactions

Increase recovery rates during mining operations

Laboratory researchers to produce well-defined bubbles with sizes and composition

DEMOS AND PROJECTS

DEMO

HAB removal boat utilizes micro/nano bubble air flotation and slurry dewatering to physically remove algae (especially micro green algae) from impaired water.

This project was awarded by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) 2019 fiscal year Grants to Prevent, Mitigate and/or Control of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms to implement a mobile floating platform to mechanically remove HABs.

Each year, the algal bloom is visible in June-July in Branch Brook Park and the HAB is most prevalent during the month of August. This in-situ algal removal boat aims to clarify HAB-affected waterbodies, including the surface and water columns as deep as 4-6 ft. In 2022, the HAB removal boat arrived at Branch Brook Park and started the HAB removal operation.

GRANTS AND AWARDS

  • Development of Reactive Nanobubble Systems for Efficient and Scalable Harmful Algae and Cyanotoxin Removal funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) via the P3 phase I Grant (83945101-0, 2018-2019)
  • Development of Reactive Nanobubble Systems for Efficient and Scalable Harmful Algae and Cyanotoxin Removal funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) via the P3 phase II Grant(84001901, 2020-2021)
  • Reactive Nanobubbles Technology for Green and Sustainable Environmental and Agricultural Applications funded by National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps(1912367, 2019-2021)
  • Effects of Microbubble Formation on Sediment Pollutant Resuspension funded by New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute (NJWRRI), The United States Geological Survey (USGS)(2020NJ027B, 2020-2021)
  • Use of Novel Nanobubble Watering Processes for Enhanced Plant Growth and Pathogen Control funded by State Department of Agriculture (USDA): Agriculture Systems and Technology: Nanotechnology for Agricultural and Food Systems(2019-67021-29450, 2019-2023)
  • Mechanical Removal of HABs in Lakes using Air Micro-Nano Bubbles from a Specialized Floating Platform funded by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) grant project(1343716, 2021-2024)
  • A Green and Powerful Wash with Nanobubble Water for Soil Contamination Removal to Alleviate Groundwater Pollution funded by New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute (NJWRRI), The United States Geological Survey (USGS) (2020NJ025B, 2022-2023)

PATENT

Generation of nanobubbles using a surface functionalized ceramic nanofiltration membrane.

Patent ID: US 2019/0083945 A1

Data of submission or granted: 12/2021

BOOK PUBLICATIONS

  1. Shi, Xiaonan, Taha Marhaba, and Wen Zhang. “Ozonation Nanobubble Technology.” In Advanced Ozonation Processes for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Advanced Ozonation Processes for Water and Wastewater Treatment, Royal society of Chemistry, pp. 353-370. 2022.
  2. Wen Zhang*, Shan Xue, Xiaonan Shi, and Taha Marhaba. ” Nanobubble Technology: Generation, Properties and Applications.” In Emerging Nanotechnologies for Water Treatment, Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 447-506. 2021.

JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

  1. Xue, Shan, Taha Marhaba, and Wen Zhang. “Nanobubble Watering Affects Nutrient Release and Soil Characteristics.” ACS Agricultural Science & Technology 2, no. 3 (2022): 453-461.
  2. Shan Xue, Yihan Zhang, Taha Marhaba, and Wen Zhang*. “Aeration and Dissolution Behavior of Oxygen Nanobubbles in Water.” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. 609 (2022): 584-591.
  3. Xiaonan Shi, Shan Xue, Taha Marhaba, and Wen Zhang*. “Probing Internal Pressures and Long-Term Stability of Nanobubbles in Water.” Langmuir 37, no. 7 (2021): 2514-2522.
  4. Ahmed, Ahmed Khaled Abdella, Xiaonan Shi, (Co-first author) Likun Hua, Leidy Manzueta, Weihua Qing, Taha Marhaba, and Wen Zhang. “Influences of Air, Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide Nanobubbles on Seed Germination and Plant Growth.” Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 66, no. 20 (2018): 5117-5124.
  5. AKA Ahmed, Wen Zhang et al. “Generation of nanobubbles by ceramic membrane filters: The dependence of bubble size and zeta potential on surface coating, pore size and injected gas pressure.” Chemosphere 203 (2018): 327-335.
  6. AKA Ahmed, Wen Zhang, et al. “Colloidal Properties of Air, Oxygen, and Nitrogen Nanobubbles in Water: Effects of Ionic Strength, Natural Organic Matters, and Surfactants.” Environmental Engineering Science 35.7 (2018): 720-727.
  7. AKA Ahmed, Xiaonan Shi, Wen Zhang et al. “Influences of Air, Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide Nanobubbles on Seed Germination and Plant Growth.” Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 66.20 (2018): 5117-5124.